Archive for category fashion trends

Children’s Fashion Trends

Children’s fashion has changed considerably in modern society. In fact, we only need to go back to the 80s to realise just how much things have changed. During the 1980s, there was really no such thing as children’s fashion, in those days children’s clothing was simply a matter of practicality: parents dressed their children in clothes that were suitable for play, and which it did not matter too much if they were covered in stains or torn. For example, boy’s tracksuits were popular for both genders, and the shell suit took the population by storm.

Nowadays things have changed, and children’s fashion is now a multibillion-pound industry. From world-class designers, to offbeat boutiques, it is certainly fair to claim that children are well catered for in terms of fashion.

If you are a new parent, or if you have been too busy to take the issue seriously, then this article is for you. Here, we will discuss some of the hottest trends in children’s clothing currently in circulation.

Tracksuits

Boys will breathe a huge sigh of relief here; the boy’s tracksuit is still a firm favourite amongst fashion gurus. Thanks largely to the popularity of hip-hop and break dancing, the tracksuit is here to stay for a few more seasons yet. Read the rest of this entry »

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Top Ten Fashion Trends From the 1940′s

Rationing:

World War II impacted virtually every aspect of American life and fashion was no exception. In 1942, the United States imposed a rationing system similar to the one Great Britain had implemented the previous year, limiting, among other things, the amount of fabric that could be used in a single garment. Materials including wool, silk, leather and a fledgling DuPont Corp. invention called nylon were diverted for use in uniforms, parachutes, shoelaces and even bomber noses.

Jackets could be no more than 25 inches in length, pants no more than 19 inches in circumference at the hem, belts no more than two inches wide and heels no more than an inch in height. Hemlines rose to the knee in an effort to conserve fabric. Buttons, cuffs, pockets and decorative details like ruffles and lace were used sparingly. Women wore shorter, boxy jackets for a V-shaped silhouette reminiscent of military uniforms. Even Hollywood traded elaborate costumes for simplified designs, a move many claimed lent movies a new air of realism.

Nylon:

As soon as it was introduced in 1938, women embraced synthetic nylon as a replacement for silk stockings. In the early 1940s, however, with silk already diverted to the war effort, the government recognized similar uses for nylon and commandeered it as well. Women responded by coating their legs in tan makeup and drawing lines up the backs of their calves to mimic seams. By the time the war ended and stockings returned to store shelves, nylon had become a generic term for hosiery. Read the rest of this entry »

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